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Enjoy the Great Memories of your Favorite Artist from the Vinyl Era

Willie Nelson Special Album Coaster Collector Set
Willie Nelson Special Album Coaster Collector Set
Click on the Image to Enlarge Coasters
This Special 4 Coaster Collector Set is made from authentic 33LP record albums. They make a great gift or a collectable for any music lover. The coasters have been waterproofed and a CORK BACKING back has been applied.
   Item No. : CS125
    Desc : Willie Nelson Special Album Coaster Collector Set
   Price : $39.95   
Note: We will attempt to duplicate the exact set shown. If every release shown in the set is not available at the time of shipping your order οΏ½ a different release from the band/artist may be sent. It will be the same band and label.

Biography: Willie Nelson Special Album Coaster Collector Set
Biography by Stephen Thomas Erlewine
As a songwriter and a performer, Willie Nelson played a vital role in post-rock & roll country music. Although he didn't become a star until the mid-'70s, Nelson spent the '60s writing songs that became hits for stars like Ray Price (""Night Life""), Patsy Cline (""Crazy""), Faron Young (""Hello Walls""), and Billy Walker (""Funny How Time Slips Away"") as well as releasing a series of records on Liberty and RCA that earned him a small, but devoted, cult following. During the early '70s, Willie aligned himself with Waylon Jennings and the burgeoning outlaw country movement which made him into a star in 1975. Following the crossover success of that year's The Red Headed Stranger and ""Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain,"" Nelson was a genuine star, as recognizable in pop circles as he was to the country audience; in addition to recording, he also launched an acting career in the early '80s. Even when he was a star, Willie never played it safe musically. Instead, he borrowed from a wide variety of styles, including traditional pop, Western swing, jazz, traditional country, cowboy songs, honky tonk, rock & roll, folk, and the blues, creating a distinctive, elastic hybrid. Nelson remained at the top of the country charts until the mid-'80s, when his lifestyle — which had always been close to the outlaw clichιs his music flirted with — began to spiral out of control, culminating in an infamous battle with the IRS in the late '80s. During the '90s, Nelson's sales never reached the heights that he had experienced a decade earlier, but he remained a vital icon in country music, having greatly influenced the new country, new traditionalist, and alternative country movements of the '80s and '90s as well as leaving behind a legacy of classic songs and recordings.

Nelson began performing music as a child growing up in Abbott, TX. After his father died and his mother ran away, Nelson and his sister Bobbie were raised by their grandparents, who encouraged both children to play instruments. Willie picked up the guitar, and by the time he was seven, he was already writing songs. Bobbie learned to play piano, eventually meeting — and later marrying — fiddler Bud Fletcher, who invited both of the siblings to join his band. Nelson had already played with Raychecks' Polka Band, but with Fletcher, he acted as the group's frontman. Willie stayed with Fletcher throughout high school. Upon his graduation, he joined the Air Force but had to leave shortly afterward, when he became plagued by back problems. Following his disenrollment from the service, he began looking for full-time work. After he worked several part-time jobs, he landed a job as a country DJ at Fort Worth's KCNC in 1954. Nelson continued to sing in honky tonks as he worked as a DJ, deciding to make a stab at recording career by 1956. That year, he headed to Vancouver, WA, where he recorded Leon Payne's ""Lumberjack."" At that time, Payne was a DJ and he plugged ""Lumberjack"" on the air, which eventually resulted in sales of 3,000 — a respectable figure for an independent single, but not enough to gain much attention. For the next few years, Willie continued to DJ and sing in clubs. During this time, he sold ""Family Bible"" to a guitar instructor for 50 dollars, and when the song became a hit for Claude Gray in 1960, Nelson decided to move to Nashville the following year to try his luck. Though his nasal voice and jazzy, off-center phrasing didn't win him many friends — several demos were made and then rejected by various labels — his songwriting ability didn't go unnoticed, and soon Hank Cochran helped Willie land a publishing contract at Pamper Music. Ray Price, who co-owned Pamper Music, recorded Nelson's ""Night Life"" and invited him to join his touring band, the Cherokee Cowboys, as a bassist.

Arriving at the beginning of 1961, Price's invitation began a watershed year for Nelson. Not only did he play with Price — eventually taking members of the
  Cherokee Cowboys to form his own touring band — but his songs also provided major hits for several other artists. Faron Young took ""Hello Walls"" to number one for nine weeks, Billy Walker made ""Funny How Time Slips Away"" into a Top 40 country smash, and Patsy Cline made ""Crazy"" into a Top Ten pop crossover hit. Earlier in the year, he signed a contract with Liberty Records and began releasing a series of singles that were usually drenched in strings. ""Willingly,"" a duet with his then-wife Shirley Collie, became a Top Ten hit for Nelson early in 1962, and it was followed by another Top Ten single, ""Touch Me,"" later that year. Both singles made it seem like Nelson was primed to become a star, but his career stalled just as quickly as it had taken off, and he was soon charting in the lower regions of the Top 40. Liberty closed its country division in 1964, the same year Roy Orbison had a hit with ""Pretty Paper.""

When the Monument recordings failed to become hits, Nelson moved to RCA Records in 1965, the same year he became a member of the Grand Ole Opry. Over the next seven years, Willie had a steady stream of minor hits, highlighted by the number 13 hit ""Bring Me Sunshine"" in 1969. Toward the end of his stint with RCA, he had grown frustrated with the label, who had continually tried to shoehorn him into the heavily produced Nashville sound. By 1972, he wasn't even able to reach the country Top 40. Discouraged by his lack of success, Nelson decided to retire from country music, moving back to Austin, TX, after a brief and disastrous sojourn into pig farming. Once he arrived in Austin, Nelson realized that many young rock fans were listening to country music along with the traditional honky tonk audience. Spotting an opportunity, Willie began performing again, scrapping his pop-oriented Nashville sound and image for a rock- and folk-influenced redneck outlaw image. Soon, he earned a contract with Atlantic Records.

Shotgun Willie (1973), Nelson's first album for Atlantic, was evidence of the shift of his musical style, and although it initially didn't sell well, it earned good reviews and cultivated a dedicated cult following. By the fall of 1973, his version of Bob Wills' ""Stay All Night (Stay a Little Longer)"" had cracked the country Top 40. The following year, he delivered the concept album Phases and Stages, which increased his following even more with the hit singles ""Bloody Mary Morning"" and ""After the Fire Is Gone."" But the real commercial breakthrough didn't arrive until 1975, when he severed ties with Atlantic and signed to Columbia Records, who gave him complete creative control of his records. Willie's first album for Columbia, The Red Headed Stranger, was a spare concept album about a preacher, featuring only his guitar and his sister's piano. The label was reluctant to release with such stark arrangements, but they relented and it became a huge hit, thanks to Nelson's understated cover of Roy Acuff's ""Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain.""

Following the breakthrough success of The Red Headed Stranger as well as Waylon Jennings' simultaneous success, outlaw country — so named because it worked outside of the confines of the Nashville industry — became a sensation, and RCA compiled the various-artists album Wanted: The Outlaws!, using material Nelson, Jennings, Tompall Glaser, and Jessi Colter had previously recorded for the label. The compilation boasted a number one single in the form of the newly recorded Jennings and Nelson duet ""Good Hearted Woman,"" which was also named the Country Music Association's single of the year. For the next five years, Nelson consistently charted on both the country and pop charts, with ""Remember Me,"" ""If You've Got the Money I've Got the Time,"" and ""Uncloudy Day"" becoming Top Ten country singles in 1976; ""I Love You a Thousand Ways"" and the Mary Kay Place duet ""Something to Brag About"" were Top Ten country singles the following year.

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